The Pursuit of Nothingness

  • I started writing content on Twitter and attempting to build an audience. This only lasted a few months. I never quite found what I actually wanted to create content about. My interests and thoughts are too wide ranging to develop any kind of dependency on the content I put out. But most of all, I just got sick of it (I swear if I see the THREAD emoji one more time in my feed I’m going to jump off a cliff). I felt gross about it. Not because I didn’t have actual value to give, but just that there are SO many people who are self proclaimed auteurs and masters of a grand variety of subjects constantly peppering Twitter with endless threads, links, and inspirational quotes that I very quickly became exhausted. I got so tired of it that I actively block people that post Twitter threads. I’m sure they’re nice people with good things to share, I just can’t handle it anymore. When EVERYONE proclaims themself an expert, or that they have a secret, or a framework, or an idea that can have a dramatic effect on your life, your finances, your job, and every other angle of your existence it all quickly becomes meaningless. I burned out within 90 days and I was only posting content 1–2 times a week… in the world of content that’s a surefire way to accomplish nothing, which in the end was exactly what I wanted.
  • I started a data consulting business with my brother and a friend. We made strong headway on this, and at one point had a deal lined up that would have netted me personally 25k in consulting fees. We met with an influential business executive who gave us leads, we became a partner for the software we built our services around. But in 60 days, the whole thing was flat on the floor and none of us have any desire to pick it up. The idea was good. The connections were all there. It just died and we didn’t care to even send a single email to revive it.
  • I made goal to squat 1.5x my body weight. I’ve been lifting consistently for several years and thought that there’s no way I shouldn’t be able to achieve this. I focused and lifted heavy 4 days a week, with cardio and mobility work 2 days a week. I made consistent progress for several months — achieving around 10% above my body weight. But then summer came around, and I wanted to get lean. So I cut my calories back and added more cardio and less rest. I shifted my program to focus more on bodybuilding and fat loss. I worked hard for about 8 months with a pure focus on building strength, but within spitting distance of my goal, I just lost interest.

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Cameron Warren

Cameron Warren

Writing about how teams and individuals can more effectively use data. Follow me: @camwarrenm